December box - It's time for more German holiday treats

Four days until Christmas! In Germany we start to celebrate on the 24th, Christmas Eve. On that evening the family comes together and gifts are exchanged. For many Germans it's a tradition to make a very simple dinner on Christmas Eve, that is sausages and potato salad. But in my family we always had something like turkey or duck – not our thing anymore, because Mark and I don't eat meat for couple of years now, but I'm sure we won't be hungry. During Christmas it's always a land of plenty and I'm sure we're going to eat a lot of treats, especially those we put in your November and December German candy subscription boxes.

We know that not all of our Candy German subscribers celebrate Christmas, either they are not religious or have another religion or simply don't like Christmas. We just see Christmas as the period you have time for your loved ones, the Christmas days are very cozy and you have time to reflect about the past year and have a lot of childhood memories. We tried to bring back those memories with our Christmas German candy boxes and wanted to share them with you. The November box was the first episode and now we want to tell you all about your December treats.

Meisterklasse feine Nürnberger Oblaten-Lebkuchen

This gingerbread treat's origin is the Bavarian city Nürnberg or Nuremberg as it is called in English. We have a lot of different Lebkuchen in Germany, but Nürnberger Lebkuchen is definitely the best. It's a protected designation of origin – "geschützte geografische Angabe", as you can read on the side of the treat's packaging – and must be produced within the boundaries of the city. The first Lebkuchen bakers were recorded as early as 1395 in Nuremberg.

Weiss is a brand of the German candy company Lambertz, we had some treats of in our last monthly candy box. We had to put this Lebkuchen in your December Candy German subscription box – it's really a highlight on Christmas in Germany, I can't imagine a German household not having Nürnberger Oblaten-Lebkuchen somewhere these days. By the way, "Oblaten" is the name for the paper-thin white back of the Lebkuchen. We also call it "Esspapier", edible paper, and it is reminiscent of sacramental bread you get in church. The Lebkuchen itself is very mellow, spicy, and juicy. Combined with the dark chocolate coating this German candy is just wonderful. I also like the wrapping of the Lebkuchen a lot. You can see the skyline of Nuremberg and its city emblem.

Meisterklasse feine Nürnberger Oblaten-Lebkuchen

Borggreve Butterspekulatius

Sometimes the most simple things are the best. This could be the motto for the Borggreve Butterspekulatius, of course another German candy we really have to eat – or better to say we cannot think of not eating them – around Christmas time in Germany. Spekulatius are a type of very crunchy shortcrust biscuits, but the dough does not rinse much. Sometimes they are spiced, but we decided for the buttery version, because we think that those biscuits do not need much to taste phenomenal. You can see a figure stamped on the front – that should be Saint Nicholas. Often you can also find little windmills or animals. Spekulatius are not only a speciality in Germany, they are also eaten in the Netherlands, France, and Belgium. In Germany the origin of the Spekulatius usually is Westphalia or the Rhineland.

The biscuit company Borggreve, that was founded in 1928, is known for producing their biscuits and pastry specialities in the traditional way from original recipes handed down over the years – and you can really taste that when you try the Butterspekulatius. The sweet buttery taste is adorable – so very good with a cup of coffee or tee. It just tastes like Christmas!

Borggreve Butterspekulatius

Feine Pralinés mit Lebkuchenfüllung

What a good looking candy packaging, we said when we planned the December Candy German subscription box. Therefore, it's unusual but I want to start with exactly that packaging before I come to the best, the inside. I told you about our Christmas markets in our November blog post. You can see exactly such a Christmas market on the candy's packaging. Unfortunately snow has become very seldom during pre-Christmas time around here, but this picture transfers exactly the atmosphere when you cross a Christmas market in Germany.

And now the inside: fine pralines with Lebkuchen cream. Yes, it tastes exactly like it sounds. We tried the little heart-shaped goodies and were overwhelmed. The outside is a mixture of white chocolate and milk chocolate, very creamy and rich. The cream filling is a spiced Lebkuchen cream – it consists of coriander, cinnamon, clove, nutmeg, anise, and cardamom. You can also taste little Lebkuchen pieces. Cheers for the company Trumpf! You really did an extraordinary good thing for sweetening up Christmas!

Feine Pralinés mit Lebkuchenfüllung

Lindt Excellence Orange Intense

No Christmas without Lindt chocolate. Lindt is known for producing some of the best chocolates. Therefore it is definitely more expensive then other chocolate companies' products, but it's worth it! If you are interested in getting to know more about the conching Lindt invented, please read our September Candy German blog post, especially the "Lindt Hello My Name Is Strawberry Cheesecake" paragraph.

I'm not a huge fan of dark chocolate, but the Excellence Orange Intense absolutely convinced me. It's very lightly bitter and at the same time fruity because of small orange pieces added. Tiny almond pieces make the Excellence Orange Intense crunchy and perfect the chocolate. For me the combination of chocolate, orange, and almonds is so much Christmas!

Have you ever made a chocolate fondue? If you want to make the Lindt bar even more fruity let it slowly melt in a water bath and put some fresh fruits like strawberries, bananas, grapes, or whatever you like in it. A perfect Christmas dessert!

Lindt Excellence Orange Intense

Lindt Weihnachts-Chocolade Stick

Mark insisted on putting another Lindt candy in your December Candy German subscription box, the Weihnachts-Chocolade Stick that is his favorite German candy. I haven't tried it before but I have to agree, this treat is definitely worth a little sin. Nut cream spiced with cinnamon and coriander is covered in delicious milk chocolate. If you let it melt in your mouth very slowly, you can taste every ingredient very intensely – it's really a gourmet taste.

Some might argue that Lindt actually is not a German candy producer. Yes, that's right. Lindt is a Suisse company, but Germany, Switzerland, and also Austria are so closely connected that it's hard to manifest any borders. They are used to our products, we are used to their products, it would make no sense to banish any of their candy from our German candy subscription box, especially not the wonderful Lindt chocolates!

Lindt Weihnachts-Chocolade

Milka Alpenmilch Santa Claus

In Germany every child is crazy about those little Santis. I remember me always thinking that it is a shame to eat my chocolate Santas soon. Therefore I put them on my room's shelf for days until I could not withstand eating them any longer. And they were always so good, especially the Milka ones. The little Santa is hollow from the inside, the thin chocolate is very creamy and melts in your mouth. This candy from Germany is a Must Have on Christmas.

Milka Alpenmilch Santa Claus

Favorina Confiserie goodies: Lübecker Marzipan and Edel-Nougat

Those little goodies are all different and so good. The first is a nougat fir cone. Hazelnut nougat is covered in rich milk chocolate. The second, the one in the red wrapping, is marzipan covered in dark chocolate. The third, the one in the brown wrapping, is Mocha marzipan with a light coffee flavor, and the fourth, the one in the golden wrapping, is precious hazelnut nougat without any coating. What is special about the two marzipan goodies is that they come from the city of Lübeck in north Germany. Lübecker Marzipan again is a protected designation of origin.

Favorina Confiserie goodies: Lübecker Marzipan and Edel-Nougat

That's it for our second Christmas Candy German subscription box. We hope you like our selection and are pleased with the variety of Christmas treats Germany has to offer. We wish you all a wonderful and happy Christmas, or, if you don't celebrate Christmas, just a wonderful time!